Thursday, 22 March 2018

The Shadow Registry and Specter Arms

The new bill, C-71, is poised to create a nightmare scenario by establishing a Shadow Registry.  It is essentially a registry jointly maintained by both the government and licensed firearms dealers as a condition of their license.

So what is the purpose of the Shadow Registry?  Firstly if we think the registrar will follow the letter of the law and not ask for the make and model (like the law suggests) we are deluding ourselves.  But let us assume that they follow the law to the letter.  With private transfers, there is nothing to say that non-restricted transfers need a model or serial number.  Just a verification that a transfer has taken place.  This allows for the government to accurately determine how many firearms are owned.  Inevitably this will help prevent enterprising individuals from using methods to obscure the Shadow Registry kept by gun dealers.  You might ask “what value does knowing that a gun has been transferred with no other attached information?”  To get the answer you need to look at the inferred and stated goals of Canada’s gun control scheme; disarm everyone.  By recording how many people had firearms transferred to them and how many went out, the government can accurately determine the real amounts of guns owned by new generation shooters.  When it comes time to send the door kickers to take the guns, they either get them all or arrest the gun owner because the numbers don’t match up.

And then there is the lie that gun records from retail businesses will need a warrant to access.  Retail records do not need a warrant.  This is a holdover from the old Long Gun Registry (LGR) (which became irrelevant when it was abolished).  Although it is said the records will require a warrant, it does not repeal the section that permits “looking at the books” and making copies whenever they want.  It is not common knowledge but a firearms business is given their ledger to record firearm sales.  This ledger is provided by the Chief Firearms Officer of the province they are operating out of.  This alone is a subtle reminder that you don’t own the ledger or the information within.

What does this mean for Specter Arms?

Specter Arms has built its business on the philosophy that information and privacy are valuable.  As soon as the LGR was abolished, we stopped keeping this information.  We would check if the license was valid yes, but never did we hold on to that information.  Our sales literally rose over 1000% when the LGR was gone.  What once was a struggling business became viable with our annual growth (post 2012) at 13% per year.  Why was this?  Well, privacy was the big thing.  Pre 2012, there was no reason to buy from anyone except a large retailer.  There was no privacy because of the LGR and buying from a large online retailer was convenient.  This sentiment is mirrored by the fact that from the inception of the LGR to its demise, gun businesses evaporated to only 1/6th of their previous numbers.  Post 2012, new businesses flourished.

Over 99% of SA revenue comes from gun shows.  Without the means to transfer non-restricted firearms on the weekends (CFO offices are closed), the gunshow is destined to die.  No gun shows, translates into a projected decrease in revenues of over 99%.

We at SA have a sneaking suspicion that the large gun dealers and importers are happy with this scheme.  It only serves to drive more business their way by resuming the LGR trend of wiping out small and medium business competitors.  It wipes out the gun show and all the private and grey market dealers as well.

With the new Shadow Registry, we at SA need to re-evaluate our business model.  If we are unwilling to change, we will die a swift death along with the hundreds of new small firearms businesses that are destined to die.

SA has always subscribed to an intelligence driven model which uses social media, statistics and online forums to predict trends and follow those trends.  The Shadow Registry is not a surprise to us and we started transitioning away from sales to manufacturing.  This plan is uniquely the safest but also the most dangerous; it is quite the oxymoron.  It is safe because re-investing in inventory for sales is bound to leave us caught with thousands of dollars in inventory that will never be sold.  It is dangerous because if we can not get the S3 and S5 rifle projects to market before the money runs out, we will be finished.

It is a gamble but the alternative is to close down and wait for a friendly government to undo this damage.  We will not go down without a fight; who dares, wins.

Thursday, 15 March 2018

An Open Letter to Students

You created these school shooters.

You viciously bullied people.

You tormented people with social media.

You used technology to share intimate pictures.

You consumed violent music and video games.

You ostracized people for being different.

You embraced a progressive culture devoid of morality.

And these school shooters?  They come from your peers; they are you.

The school violence is not inflicted by forces outside of your school, they all come from within.  They are the people who sit next to you, they are the people you tease and prank.  They are the people that you deliberately strip all human dignity from.

You want to find the source of gun violence?  I can promise you gun violence does not come from a gun.  It comes from you.  You can choose to fulfill the Millennial stereotype; be lazy and act like this is not your fault... blame the guns.  I have come to expect it from your generation.  Eating Tide pods and being lazy is your hallmark.

But the truth is, you are the ones making school shooters.  Stop being lazy morally and intellectually and realize that the power to change comes from you.  Look in the mirror kids, see the real perpetrator.

You want your victims disarmed so you don't have to change.  You want a situation in which you can bully people into committing suicide without the fear they will come back and take revenge.  You brats make me sick.

Saturday, 18 November 2017

Re-Entering 3-Gun (Fitness)

After a long 3 year break, I plan to re-enter the 3-gun world once again.

I feel it is necessary for me to maintain and prove my skills in order to maintain my legitimacy as a competent ‘advice giver’ on tactical topics.
After all, would you trust an overweight running coach or a Call of Duty champion to lecture you on war?  Or worse yet some self-proclaimed internet firearms journalist with no legitimate firearms experience (there are a lot of those).

I plan to post periodically about my training regimen and events that I enter.

So I have started training for 3 gun about a month ago and I have yet to even head to the range or even pick up a firearm.  A fundamental that is
overlooked is fitness.  That is where I have started.

I have always been fairly good at medium to long distance running but that is not what 3-gun requires.  3-gun requires explosive short term energy
where you are constantly starting and stopping, getting down and up, possibly crawling and bending.  It is less an aerobic exercise and more an
anaerobic exercise.  What I mean is one primarily strengthens your heart so it can work harder longer and the other strengthens your body’s ability
to metabolize and hold oxygen as well as building up Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).  It is long term power versus short term power.  3-Gun needs the intense, short term power.

3 times per week I do a shuttle run.
I sprint 55 meters stop abruptly turn around and run 50 meters back to the start line.  I stop, turn around and run back 45 meters. Then back to the
start line.  I repeat this at distances 30m, 24m and 16m.  Note how each leg of my trip gets shorter and shorter before I have to reverse direction.  The most difficult part of this exercise is changing direction.  In total this run is only 340m and I can run 2km easily but when I first did this I found myself gasping for air.  I simply could not breathe in enough oxygen.  After only a few sessions I was fine and now I have moved to the next step, you see, this is not about running; it is about improving my body’s ability to hold oxygen.  So my next step is to do this run with my CF gas mask… first without the filter (where I am right now), then with the filter attached.  Finally I will add body armor.

So why is Oxygen so important?  The more my heart pounds and the more Oxygen starved my body becomes, the more my body will tremble with every heart beat and breath, making aiming quickly and accurately harder.

My skill on the 3-gun feild will always be limited by my fitness level; that is why I am starting here.



Running The Lever Action – A Radical Departure from the Conventional


In the gunfighter program we are taught to keep our control hand on the rifle and conduct all our manipulations with the support hand.  To make this easy we will raise the rifle and rest the buttstock on our bicep pointing the barrel up.  The magazine will naturally point to our centerline and allows us to do our manipulations while watching what is ahead of us simultaneously.

From a kinematics standpoint we only rotate joints no more than 90 degrees and along the arc of greatest mobility. The arc of greatest mobility is the wrist rotation that allows you to rotate further away from its natural “zero” position then the other direction.  On your right hand this is clockwise (CCW on the left). 
Your maximum range of motion should be 100 degrees clockwise on the right hand compared to about 90 degrees counter clockwise. (If you rotate your forearm too, these angles increase)
Because one direction has a larger travel range, it is faster and more comfortable to go to 90 degrees in that larger travel range.

In cowboy action shooting, the lever action is the go-to for riflemen.
The typical lever action has a loading gate on the right side. Traditionally, a rifleman employing a lever action will have the rifle in his left hand and twist counter clockwise (short arc) to expose the
loading gate.  He then grips the forend with his support hand and releases his control hand to load more rounds into the loading gate which necessitates a counter clockwise wrist rotation to push the rounds down into the gate.  Once loaded he re-positions his hands and twists the rifle back into a shooting position.  Unless he is super-practiced and has a good means of carrying his rounds, he will need to look down at what he is doing taking his attention away from what is ahead of him.

What I propose for the lever action manual of arms is aimed at people who are right handed but cross eye dominant, someone who is left handed or ambidextrous*.  All sets of people will quickly come to appreciate this new method of employing the lever rifle.

The rifle is held in the left hand.  Upon needing to reload, the user puts the buttstock onto his bicep.  This has his rifle pointing up and in his view while he watches the terrain in front of him (ideally to move safely to cover). 
His support hand loads the rounds into the exposed loading gate which naturally sits facing the user.  When finished reloading, the rifle drops naturally back into position and because the all-important control hand has never been moved, it does not need to be re-positioned.  Situational awareness and speed are vastly improved.

For those who have run the lever for years, this will be a difficult transition but one that I feel will be worth it in the evolution of firearms as a martial art.




* All gun fighters should practice with both hands to be gun-ambidextrous.

Sunday, 27 August 2017

Stocks - Learned Something New


My expertise lies in modern sporting arms and military surplus. I have an interest in firearms that are appropriate for 3-gun or surviving SHTF.  I am no expert on long range shooting.  When I say that, I mean anything past 600 meters.

I was invited out by a friend who wanted to show me his newest load for his Remington 700…. Or maybe it was a 783… I can’t remember.  He was really proud of his rifle and happily gushed over his carbon fiber stock, his Leopould scope, his custom muzzle break and most of all, his newest reloading formula.

He invited me to shoot.  I did.  With his help on how many ‘clicks’ to set his scope for various distances, I was pleased to see that I could hit what I shot at.  Previous to this, the farthest I had (successfully) shot was at the 500 meter mark with the C7 running PWT2 in the military (And yes, I know PWT2 is not shot at 500 meters; we were fucking around to see who could do it).

I have an eye for detail and as I stood up I noticed something off about his rifle.  He was so proud of it, I was really afraid to tell him… his buttstock was bent.  Not a large amount, it was barely visible, perhaps offset about 3/16” to 1/4" to the side.

“I think your stock is defective” I mentioned and showed him that it bent slightly to the side.  I expected anger.  What I got instead was a lesson on how the slight bend allowed it to fit better in the shoulder.  I accepted his answer but I did not really believe it.*
I looked into what he had to say and found that people wiser than me agreed – The offset buttstock (known as cast off) was a help in rapidly shouldering the rifle.

I wanted to include this link because it is a good reference article about the fit of guns.  It is more imformative on the subject then I could ever be:

http://home.insightbb.com/~bspen/fit.html




*Hey… you know who you are… sorry for doubting you; it just sounded really odd.



Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Is CBC Capable of Informed Journalism?

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/canada-far-right-extremism-csis-1.4248183


Short answer - no.  But that would be a dull blog entry.

CBC's published article suggests that Canada's intelligence community has been concentrating on preventing Islamic terrorism when they should devote more of those resources to fighting far-right movements.

The search has been on for a non-Islamic bad guy for quite some time (as early as 2013).  The article even says that a former CSIS analyst does not believe far-right activities require the resources to combat because they don't need to.  Their crimes tend to be minor in nature and unworthy of attention at the national level.  I (as a former analyst) agree.

As I have mentioned, groups like Freemen on the Land don't go around murdering people as part of their core ideology.  The article even admits that.

CBC clearly does not heed the words of experts. Instead, after stating the facts from someone who is trained to know better, they dragged up a person whose only qualification was as a former white-supremacist to make the case that the far right was dangerous.  They minus well of grabbed my 4- year old son to explain the terror that crocodile-ghosts can inflict on the population.
Why isn't CSIS going after crocodile-ghosts?  That actually sounds really scary.

And what prompted this article?  Why the Virginia protests, where neo-Nazis clashed with Antifa Terrorists.  National Socialists (Nazis) (which have left wing beliefs combined with a racial belief in white superiority) were against Marxist Socialists (which have left wing beliefs combined with racist policies towards whites).
Both are racists and both are left wing.  And I have learned that when anything is left wing, it is always, violent, immoral and covetous to the core.

So I'm still waiting for someone to come up with something credible to suggest that right wing movements like Freemen on the Land or the 3 percenters are dangerous when all the violence is being perpetrated by the left.
You can't convince me that 3 percenters are equivalent to white supremacist protesters when people of all colors make up their ranks.
You can't convince me that Freemen on the Land are plotting and organizing against the government when by their very nature, they are isolationists who want to be ignored.
You can't convince me that libertarians are evil for getting upset at the loss of thier freedom of speech.


CBC needs to inject some common sense into their reporting.  It might make up for their lack of facts and obvious bias.


Sunday, 6 August 2017

Sig... You were so close

Despite over 4 decades of "experts" declaring the death of the SMG it is still going strong in militaries and police forces through the world.

Sig Sauer set about to make the next generation of SMG called the MPX.  Its name harkens back the venerable MP5 which is considered to be the "gold standard" for SMGs.  I had a chance to handle the MPX the other day and I found myself lukewarm to the platform.

They used advanced polymers to reduce weight and decrease production costs - something that both militaries and civilian buyers can appreciate.  They kept the capability for the telescoping stock and offered KeyMod handguards to allow for mission customization with reduced weight.  Probably the best improvement was the full rail across the top.

But Sig made a tragic error.  They moved the German style cocking handle from the forend and moved it to the ridiculously placed position above the receiver just like the AR15.
I never have been a fan of this system because to use the cocking handle you need to break your line of sight or hit yourself in the face as you pull it back.  Both are unacceptable to me.
Bushmaster built a 9mm AR years ago.  Both the Bushmaster and the MPX are restricted firearms that essentially have the same features and manual of arms.  It makes me wonder why Sig even tried with an established, nearly identical, product on the market already.

Removing the famous HK diopter sights was also a mistake.  This forces the end user to buy their own sights and I will explain why this is bad.  All aftermarket sights (with the exception of Centurion Arms) are designed for a rifle.  The round HK sights are designed to use the brain's natural ability to line up circles quickly.  The HK sight is by far the fastest sighting iron sight out there and it may not be as practical as a rifle sight for distance but we are dealing with a pistol caliber round which will not get any measurable performance past 100 meters.  Perhaps in this day and age iron sights are not important and they assumed that everyone would use an optic.  I might be old school but I personally like to have iron sights, even on an optic equipped rifle.  If I purchase the MPX (which I doubt I will), the first thing I am going to do is machine some diopter sights.

The MPX is ok but it is not special by any stretch of the imagination.  To me, it is nothing more than a re-imagined AR15 with a lot of LCF (look cool factor).